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The 13 Most Common Errors on a Novel's First Page

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

miscperson:

hello-darling-assbutts:

elementsheep:

disneymagiclaughter:

Aladdin, 1992

The opening scene with the street merchant was completely unscripted. Robin Williams was brought into the sound stage and was asked to stand behind a table that had several objects on it and a bed sheet covering them all. The animators asked him to lift the sheet, and without looking take an object from the table and describe it in character. Much of the material in that recording session was not appropriate for a Disney film. 

"Combination hookah and coffee maker, also makes julienne fries!  It will not break! It will not- …. it broke."

that line used to just kill me as a kid and now it’s better because it was unscripted and he probably broke the prop

If you dont love Robin Williams you are wrong

I want that recording session unedited…who’s soul do I have to sell?

jessiej7732:

smiles-sunsets-and-sarcasm:

That awful moment when you learn that this wasn’t scripted. That Will Smith’s character was actually supposed to brush off the whole thing, but Will’s father actually had left him when he was younger and he just fell apart on the set and the hug at the end was from one actor to another, not one character to another…

well it’s not amazing but you know what I mean

notemily:

mizufae:

drjohnham1shwatson:

the-ironhandofpimpery:

rectalragnarok:

filthylittleoptimist:

clickthefrog:

chaznotts:

littlefallraindrop:

yourfutureleader:

angelophile:

Seriously, did anyone have more fun making the Harry Potter movies than Kenneth Branagh?

I’m sorry but this is one of those pictures I *have* to reblog whenever it appears on my dash.

WAIT WAIT WAIT IS THIS THE GUY WHO DIRECTED AND ACTED IN HAMLET? THE PERSON IN THE HAMLET FILM THAT I’VE BEEN WATCHING IN CLASS?

Yes this is the guy!

And he also directed Thor

gilderoy lockhart directed thor? 

he also played miguel in Road to El Dorado

he literally did every shakespeare play and made the movie, playing the lead

cocky shit

or did he just wipe the directors minds and put his name in the credits?

I take exception to the majority of the casting decision in the HP movies, but there literally could not have been a more perfect choice for Lockhart.

OR DID HE JUST WIPE THE DIRECTORS MINDS AND PUT HIS NAME IN THE CREDITS

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